Jesus Christ calls us to be a joyful community that celebrates God's love, transforms lives, and is a force for justice in the world.

Sermons on Mark

Rest Awhile

What a lovely story, we might think, about how Jesus cared for these simple people, who didn’t have any idea what to do. “Sheep without a shepherd” sounds like a gentle way to call them all kind of dumb. It’s not.

“Roots in Love”

LGBTQ movements are radically pointing followers of Jesus back to the heart of our tradition… Our faith calls us to love, “for God is love and those who abide in love abide in God and God in them.”

Casting out Demons

A stronger sense of community is how Jesus, whose Spirit is still alive among us, casts those “demons”‘ out. When people are seen, heard, valued, listened to—in a word, loved—that’s when those spirits that speak self-doubt, isolation, and hopelessness are cast out.

Have it your way

Looking back over our personal histories, how many of our lives have changed because of those moments when we followed the tug of the Spirit and took the riskier, less convenient, or more truthful route? It’s often in the opposite direction of having it our usual way that was Jesus said comes into full view: “The kingdom of God has come near.”

Beloved

If we are to pursue the beloved community, in which love is the “law of the land,” or the law of our neighborhoods, our schools, our churches, or even our own families and friend circles, we have to be grounded in our own belovedness.

Faith + Love x 3

St. Mark’s, please do not underestimate the importance of your public witness of being a welcoming and affirming, More Light church. Thank you for sending overtures calling for ordination policy change and marriage equality…Thank you for connecting LGBT issues with all other social justice issues… While we appropriately honor this progress, the bending of the arc of history toward justice as Dr. King spoke of, we are also aware that in this time, being a Christian is complicated and problematic.

God’s Joke

The joke of Easter morning was God’s. The joke was on the authorities who conspired against Jesus. The joke was on the Romans; the mightiest empire couldn’t keep down a peasant from Galilee! The joke was on death itself, the ultimate divide and “last enemy,” as the Apostle Paul called it, that ultimate reality over which no one has control.

Broken & Repaired: the Cross

This is a God who is present in suffering, who suffers with us, who has tastes human experience. This is a God whose heart breaks at injustice. This is a God who chooses to be in solidarity with all who are scared, excluded, oppressed, hurting, and ashamed. We don’t look at the cross and see a bloodthirsty God who needs to be appeased, who relishes the pain of God’s child out of some perverted sense of justice; we behold a God of compassion, literally “with-suffering.”

Broken & Repaired: Everything

We humans like to speculate about the future; it’s in our nature. You can see it in the disciples’ anxiousness when they say: “Tell us, when will these things happen? And what will be the sign that they are all about to be fulfilled?” But Jesus’ directed their gaze and directs ours to the present moment. “Look!” Christ urges us, “Look around you right now! Keep alert! Watch for the new thing I am doing. I am present in the midst of this tragedy and all of this mayhem. I know it’s hard to see, but keep your eyes peeled for how I am coaxing new life out of hopelessness.”